Conference


Interested in hosting 1vyG 2017? Applications are due Friday, May 6th at midnight and decisions will be released by June 1st. Here is the application link.

 

Contact: Conference@1vyG.org

Applications for hosting 1vyG 2017

due Friday, May 6th at midnight

Process

After all applications are received, a selection committee composed of individuals from each school will review applications, deliberate, and submit anonymous votes to select the host school. Individuals who are applying as the main point people for a school may not participate on the selection committee, but other individuals may still represent that school during the selection process.

If selected, while it is not a requirement that conference chairs work on the conference over the summer, it is expected that they schedule a conversation with the 1vyG Founders and past year's conference chairs to check-in once or twice before the school year begins.

1 application per school

Please note that each school can only submit one proposal, so please be in consultation with the first-gen community on your campus about which two individuals will be applying on behalf of your school. Taking on the responsibility as conference co-chair is an incredibly demanding time commitment and should not be taken lightly. If you already have multiple prior commitments for next year (academic, social, or otherwise), please strongly consider this before applying for the position. All questions, concerns, and clarifications can be directed to team@1vyG.org.

Feel free to reach out to  team@1vyG.org to be connected to 1vyG 2015 (Brown) Co-Chairs: Stanley Stewart, Manuel Contreras, Jessica Brown or 1vyG 2016  (Harvard) Co-Chairs: Ana Barros, Ted White for feedback or further insights. 


Hosted by the Harvard College First-Generation Students' Union 

CO-CHAIRS: ANA BARROS '16 & TED WHITE '17, PRESIDENT AND VICE-PRESIDENT OF FGSU


The first and only Conference for and by first-generation college students, 1vyG brings together students, administrators, alumni, experts, and community partners to strengthen and empower the first-generation community for collective change. 


Keynote Speakers

Prudence Carter

1vyG Trailblazer Award Winner

Prudence Carter is the new Dean of the Graduate School of Education at UC Berkeley. She is currently the Jacks Family Professor of Education at Stanford University, where she teaches a range of courses on racial and ethnic relations, social and cultural inequality, the sociology of education, and urban schooling. She is also the faculty director of the John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities. She received her ScB from Brown University and her Ph.D. from Columbia University. Dr. Carter is the author of award-winning books including, Keepin’ It Real: School Success Beyond Black and White (Oxford University Press, 2005) and Stubborn Roots: Race, Culture, and Inequality in U.S. and South African Schools (Oxford University Press, 2012), and is co-editor of Closing the Opportunity Gap: What America Must Do to Give All Children an Even Chance (Oxford University Press, 2013).

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David Coleman

David Coleman is one of the most important voices in education today, earning him a spot in Time magazine’s 100 most influential people. A proud product of New York Public Schools, David attended Yale University where his activism matured. At Yale he started Branch, a community service program for inner-city students in New Haven, CT. He would go on to the University of Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar where he studied English Literature and then classical educational philosophy at the University of Cambridge (U.K). He returned to the U.S. to work at McKinsey & Company, where he led much of the firm’s pro bono work in education. After McKinsey, David focused his attention on education reform. With a team of educators, David founded the Grow Network, an organization committed to making assessment results truly useful for teachers, parents and students. He also cofounded Student Achievement Partners, a nonprofit that assembles educators and researchers to design actions based on evidence to improve student outcomes, which played a leading role in developing the Common Core State Standards in math and literacy. Since 2012, David has served as the President and Chief Executive Officer of College Board. 


ANNOUNCED Schedule

(PDF available here)

Friday, FEBRUARY 19, 2016

  • 5:00PM – 9:00PM: REGISTRATION, TICKNOR LOUNGE

  • 7:00PM – 9:00PM: CASUAL MIXER, SOCH  (Co-Sponsored by Leadership Enterprise for a Diverse America)

 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2016

MORNING PROGRAMMING:

  • 8:00AM – 10:00AM: REGISTRATION, TICKNOR LOUNGE

  • 8:00 AM – 9:00AM: BREAKFAST, SCIENCE CENTER ARCADE

  • 9:00AM – 10:00 AM: WELCOME ADDRESS, SCIENCE CENTER B

  • 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM: STUDENT GUIDED DISCUSSIONS

  • 10:00 AM – 11:00AM: ADMINISTRATOR PROGRAMMING

  • 11:00 AM – 12:00PM: PRUDENCE CARTER: KEYNOTE ADDRESS & 1VYG TRAILBLAZER AWARD CEREMONY, MEMORIAL CHURCH

  • 12:00PM – 1:30PM: LUNCH

 

SATURDAY BREAKOUT SESSIONS:

1:30PM – 2:30PM:

  • JEREMY WRIGHT: LOW INCOME-STATUS: A CAUSE FOR CELEBRATION? HARVARD HALL 104

  • GOOGLE: PERSONAL BRANDING ON PAPER AND IN ACTION, EMERSON 101

1:30PM – 3:30PM: 

  • STEPHANY CUEVAS: BEYOND THE HOME: ENGAGING AND PARTNERING WITH FAMILIES FOR FIRST-GENERATION STUDENT SUCCESS, HARVARD HALL 202

  • MICHELLE TOLAN & DANIELLE SCUGOZA, FIRST GENERATION COLLEGE STUDENTS IN STUDY ABROAD, HARVARD HALL 102

2:30PM – 3:30PM: 

  • HELPING COLLEGES HELP STUDENTS, MODERATED BY PAUL TOUGH. FEATURED PANELISTS INCLUDE ANTHONY JACK, MICERE KEELS, SARA GOLDRICK-RAB, & CAMILLE LIZARRIBAR, EMERSON 105

  • ASHLEY RONDINI: FROM CAUTIONARY TALES TO ASPIRATIONAL PROXIES: EDUCATIONAL MOBILITY AND INTERGENERATIONAL MEANING-MAKING PROCESSES WITHIN FAMILIES OF LOW-INCOME FIRST GENERATION COLLEGE STUDENTS, EMERSON 210

3:30PM – 4:30PM: 

  • RICHARD KAHLENBERG: NEW PATHS TO HIGHER EDUCATION DIVERSITY, HARVARD HALL 201

  • JEN MANION, BUILDING SUCCESSFUL RELATIONSHIPS WITH PROFESSORS, EMERSON 101

  • GOLDMAN SACHS: DIVERSE JOURNEYS,  HARVARD HALL 104

 

evening PROGRAMMING

  • 5:00PM – 6:00PM: CAREER RECEPTION, CAMBRIDGE QUEENSHEAD PUB

  • 6:00PM – 7:00PM: NAVIGATING CAREER PATHS FROM A FIRST-GENERATION PERSPECTIVE, LOWELL LECTURE HALL

  • 8:30PM – 10:00PM: DINNER, ANNENBERG HALL

  • 10:00PM – 2:00AM: (F)IRSTY: PART II: THE AFTER-PARTY, SOCH 104

 

    SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2016

    MORNING PROGRAMMING:

    • 8:00 AM – 9:00AM: LUGGAGE DROP-OFF, TICKNOR LOUNGE

    • 8:00 AM – 9:00AM: BREAKFAST, SCIENCE CENTER ARCADE

     

    SUNDAY BREAKOUT SESSIONS:

    9:00AM – 10:30AM

    • ROBERTO GONZALES: NEGOTIATING LIVES IN LIMBO: UNDOCUMENTED AND NAVIGATING CRITICAL TRANSITIONS, HARVARD HALL 202

    • SARA GOLDRICK-RAB: PAYING THE PRICE: COLLEGE COSTS AND THE BETRAYAL OF THE AMERICAN DREAM, HARVARD HALL 201

    10:30AM – 11:30AM

    • ANTHONY JACK: ‘I, TOO, AM HUNGRY’: AN EXAMINATION OF STRUCTURAL EXCLUSION AT AN ELITE UNIVERSITY, SEVER 113

    • PAUL TOUGH: WHO NEEDS COLLEGE? HARVARD HALL 104

     

    SUNDAY (Afternoon), FEBRUARY 21, 2016

    • 12:00PM – 2:00PM LUNCH OR SCHOOL ACTION PLANNING, THE HARVARD INN & SCHOOL ACTION PLANNING, SEVER HALL

    • 12:00PM – 1:30PM: SEPARATE ADMINISTRATOR LUNCH AND PROGRAMMING

    • 2:00 PM – 3:30PM: CLOSING ADDRESS, SCIENCE CENTER B

    • 3:00 PM – 5:00PM: LUGGAGE PICK-UP, TICKNOR LOUNGE

     


    Announced Speakers

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    Paul Tough is the author, most recently, of "How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character." His first book, "Whatever It Takes: Geoffrey Canada’s Quest to Change Harlem and America," was published in 2008.

    Paul is a contributing writer to the New York Times Magazine, where he has written extensively about education, parenting, poverty, and politics. His most recent article, "Who Gets to Graduate?," focused on innovative efforts to improve graduation rates for first-generation and low-income college students.

    He has worked as an editor at the New York Times Magazine and Harper’s Magazine and as a reporter and producer for the public-radio program “This American Life.” His writing has also appeared in the New Yorker, Slate, GQ, and Esquire, and on the op-ed page of the New York Times.

    Micere Keels is Associate Professor in Comparative Human Development at the University of Chicago. Her research focuses on understanding how sociodemographic characteristics (race/ethnicity and poverty, in particular) structure exposures contextual challenges and supports. Over the past decade and a half her work has examined several issues regarding educational inequality. In 2012 she received the five-year Faculty Scholars Award from the William T. Grant Foundation to follow a sample of 500 Black and Latino freshmen across their first four years of college. This project is examining the unfolding early adult trajectory of students that are above average in their college preparedness, which allows her to focus on barriers to success among a group that possess the academic and motivational perquisites. Her work has been featured in Chicago Tribune, Chronicle of Higher Education, Grist, andU.S. News and World Report. 

    Richard Kahlenberg has been called “the intellectual father of the economic integration movement” in K-12 schooling and “arguably the nation's chief proponent of class-based affirmative action in higher education admissions.” He is also an authority on teachers’ unions, private school vouchers, charter schools, turnaround school efforts, labor organizing and inequality in higher education. Kahlenberg's articles have been published in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The New Republic, and elsewhere. He has appeared on ABC, CBS, CNN, FOX, C-SPAN, MSNBC, and NPR. Previously, Kahlenberg was a Fellow at the Center for National Policy, a visiting associate professor of constitutional law at George Washington University, and a legislative assistant to Senator Charles S. Robb (D-VA). He also serves on the advisory board of the Pell Institute, the Albert Shanker Institute and the Research Advisory Panel of the National Coalition for School Diversity. In addition, he is the winner of the William A. Kaplin Award for Excellence in Higher Education Law and Policy Scholarship. He graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College and cum laude from Harvard Law School. Between college and law school, he spent a year at the University of Nairobi School of Journalism as a Rotary Scholar.

    Sara Goldrick-Rab is Professor of Educational Policy Studies and Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is also Senior Scholar at the Wisconsin Center for the Advancement of Postsecondary Education and an affiliate of the Center for Financial Security, Institute for Research on Poverty, and the Consortium for Chicago School Research. Goldrick-Rab’s commitment to scholar-activism is evidenced by her broad profile of research and writing dissecting the intended and unintended consequences of the college-for-all movement in the United States. In more than a dozen experimental, longitudinal, and mixed-methods research projects, she has examined the efficacy and distributional implications of financial aid policies, welfare reform, transfer practices, and a range of interventions aimed at increasing college attainment among marginalized populations. This year, Harvard Education Press is releasing her latest book, Reinventing Student Aid for the 21st Century, co-edited with Andrew P. Kelly. In 2006, Goldrick-Rab was named a National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation postdoctoral fellow, and in 2010 she received the five-year Faculty Scholars Award from the William T. Grant Foundation for her project, “Rethinking College Choice in America.” In 2014, the American Educational Research Association honored Goldrick-Rab with its Early Career Award. She provides extensive service to local, state, and national communities, working directly with governors and state legislators to craft policies to make college more affordable, collaborating with non-profit organizations seeking to examine the effects of their practices, and providing technical assistance to Congressional staff, think tanks, and membership organizations throughout Washington, DC. In spring 2013, Goldrick-Rab testified about her work on college affordability before the United States Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, chaired by Senators Tom Harkin and Lamar Alexander. In May of 2014, Goldrick-Rab became the founding director of the Wisconsin HOPE Lab, the nation’s first translational research laboratory aimed at identifying new and effective ways to minimize barriers to college completion so that more students can reach their full potential.

     

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    Anthony (Tony) Jack is a Ph.D. Candidate in Sociology and Associate Doctoral Fellow in the Multidisciplinary Program in Inequality and Social Policy at Harvard University. His research uncovers the overlooked diversity among lower-income undergraduates: the Doubly Disadvantaged—those who enter college from local, typically distressed public high schools—and Privileged Poor—those who do so from boarding, day, and preparatory high schools. Tony holds fellowships from the Ford Foundation and the National Science Foundation (NSF). He is also a 2015 National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellow. Additionally, The New York TimesThe Boston GlobeThe Huffington Post, and American RadioWorks have featured his research as well as biographical profiles of his experiences of being a first-generation college student.

    Roberto Gonzales is Assistant Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. His research focuses on the factors that promote and impede the educational progress of immigrant and Latino students. Over the last decade and a half Professor Gonzales has been engaged in critical inquiry around the important question of what happens to undocumented immigrant children as they make transitions to adolescence and young adulthood. Since 2002 he has carried out what is arguably the most comprehensive study of undocumented immigrant young adults in the United States. His book, Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America, forthcoming from the University of California Press in December 2015, is based on an in-depth study that followed 150 undocumented young adults in Los Angeles for twelve years. In addition, Professor Gonzales’ National UnDACAmented Research Project has surveyed nearly 2,700 undocumented young adults and is presently carrying out 600 in-depth interviews on their experiences following President Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. In addition to scholarly journals, his work has been has been featured in the The New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, The Wall Street Journal, La Opinion, TIME, CNN and NPR. His work is supported by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Heising-Simons Foundation, and the James Irvine Foundation.

    Lauren Rivera is the author of Pedigree: How Elite Students Get Elite Jobs. She joined the Kellogg faculty in 2009. Her research investigates how people evaluate merit and social status in real-life, organizational contexts. She has written extensively on hiring and promotion practices in elite professional service firms. Her work has been featured in theAtlantic, Economist, Financial Times, Forbes, Fortune,Huffington Post, New Yorker, New York Times, and Wall Street Journal. A cultural sociologist by training, her work draws from both qualitative and quantitative techniques and bridges micro- and macro-levels of analysis. Before joining the MORS Department, Dr. Rivera received her Ph.D. in sociology from Harvard University, her B.A. in psychology and sociology from Yale University, and was a Consultant at Monitor Group.

    Ashley C. Rondini, PhD is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology at Franklin and Marshall College. She is currently co-editing Clearing the Path: Qualitative Studies of the Experiences of First Generation College Students (forthcoming in 2017, Lexington Books)  with Bedelia Richards-Dowden and Nicolas Simon. Her research focuses on the intersubjective processes through which low-income first generation college students and their parents co-construct the meanings of educational mobility in light of intergenerational biographical narratives. She is the author of a forthcoming (March 2016) article in Sociological Forum titled “Healing the Hidden Injuries of Class?: Redemption Narratives, Aspirational Proxies, and Parents of Low-Income First Generation College Students,” as well as chapter titled “I thought I was so dumb…:Low Income First Generation College Students, Educational Inequities, and Reference Group Theory,” in Research Studies in Higher Education: Education Multicultural College Students (University of America Press, 2012), edited by Terence Hicks and Abul Pitre. She served as the 2010-2011 American Sociological Association Applied Social Research and Social Policy Sydney S. Spivack Congressional fellow, and worked with the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Education and Labor as well as the Congressional Research Service Domestic Social Policy Division on Higher Education during her tenure. Her applied work with first-generation college students has included 7 years as a mentor with the Posse Scholars program, and 5 years as an instructor for the Myra Kraft Transitional Year Program at Brandeis University. She currently serves on the editorial board of Teaching Sociology, is the area editor for the “Race, Gender, and Class” section of the American Sociological Association’s online Teaching Resources and Innovations Library in Sociology (TRAILS), and is the past recipient of an American Sociological Association Carla B. Howery Teaching Grant. Her research has been featured in Teaching Sociology and Sociology Compass, and her forthcoming work will be featured in Sociological Forum and The DuBois Review. Dr. Rondini holds a joint PhD in Sociology and Social Policy and an MA in Social Policy from Brandeis University, an MA in Women's Studies from the University of Sussex, and a BA from Clark University, where she graduated Phi Beta Kappaand Magna Cum Laude

    PBS’ Senior Vice President, Station Services. In his role, Juan leads a team focused on strengthening local PBS stations nationwide by activating the PBS network across the country. Believing that the top asset in the PBS system is the people at each station – staff, board, and volunteers -- Juan’s team is connecting these people across stations so they can meet and build relationships, share ideas and experiences, strategize, take action together on key public media issues, and help drive innovation system-wide. Juan joined PBS from the Democratic National Committee where he was Senior Advisor for Hispanic Affairs helping re-elect President Obama with record-level Hispanic support. Prior to that Juan served as Executive Director of the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics for the Obama Administration. In 2008, Juan was the Texas State Director for Obama for America. Juan has been involved in community organizing/politics since the age of 16, when he was the first high school student hired to work for the Kansas Secretary of State. He worked closely with the late Willie Velasquez and the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project and completed a political biography of Willie and an organizational history of Southwest Voter, The Life and Times of Willie Velasquez—Su Voto Es Su Voz (Your Vote is Your Voice). His national strategy consulting organization, The Common Enterprise, took him to over 35 states where he worked with a wide range of communities and issues. Juan was the third Latino awarded a Rhodes Scholarship. He graduated from Harvard College with a B.A. in Government, holds a B.A. in Politics, Philosophy & Economics from The Queen’s College, Oxford University, a J.D. from Stanford Law School, and has been admitted to the Texas Bar.

     

     

    Questions? REACH OUT TO CONFERENCE@1VYG.ORG.


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